When Will Windows 10 Support End

Windows 10 Home and Pro – Microsoft Lifecycle

The ModernLifecyclePolicy is followed by both Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro. This is applicable to the following editions of the book: Home, Pro, Pro Education, and Pro for Workstations are all options. Important Features updates will be provided yearly in the second half of the year starting with Windows 10, version21H2 (the Windows 10 November 2021 Update). This will be done through the General Availability Channel. More information may be found here. Microsoft will continue to support at least one Windows 10 release until October 14, 2025, with the last version being Windows 10.

Support Dates

Listing Start Date Retirement Date
Windows 10 Home and Pro 07/29/2015 10/14/2025

Releases

Version Start Date End Date
Version 21H2 11/16/2021 06/13/2023
Version 21H1 05/18/2021 12/13/2022
Version 20H2 10/20/2020 05/10/2022
Version 2004 05/27/2020 12/14/2021
Version 1909 11/12/2019 05/11/2021
Version 1903 05/21/2019 12/08/2020
Version 1809 11/13/2018 11/10/2020
Version 1803 04/30/2018 11/12/2019
Version 1709 10/17/2017 04/09/2019
Version 1703 04/11/2017 10/09/2018
Version 1607 08/02/2016 04/10/2018
Version 1511 11/10/2015 10/10/2017
Version 1507 07/29/2015 05/09/2017

Links

  • Windows as a Service (WaaS)
  • Lifecycle FAQ – Windows products
  • Product Information
  • Windows 10 Enterprise and Education
  • Windows 10 IoT Enterprise
  • Windows 10 IoT Developer
  • Windows

NotePro for Workstations was initially launched in Version 1709, and it is still in use today. Note If no deferral is requested, further Windows 10 feature updates may be installed prior to the end of Mainstream Support date specified on the product packaging.

Editions

Support for Windows 10 will continue to be accessible for another four years. Angela Lang is a contributor to CNET. After starting its progressive deployment of new features and capabilities to eligible devices just a few weeks ago, Microsoft’s operating system Windows 10 will soon join Windows 7 in the Microsoft operating system graveyard. But don’t be concerned if you’re still on an older version of Microsoft’s operating system. Microsoft will continue to support Windows 10 until the 14th of October in the year 2025.

  1. The company’s new operating system will support the Windows 11 deployment until the middle of 2022.
  2. For example, the Windows Start Menu has been relocated to a new location on the screen, and a few productivity tools have been added to assist with multitasking.
  3. More information may be found at: Windows 11 is both familiar and new at the same time.
  4. We’ll go over everything in more detail later.
  5. This story has been updated recently.

What does it mean for Microsoft to end support for Windows 10?

Microsoft will end active support for Windows 10 in 2025, the same time it ended support for Windows 7 in January 2020. You’ll be allowed to continue to use the program, but you won’t be receiving any security upgrades going forward. There will also be no new features introduced to the software during this time period. Instead, Microsoft is concentrating its efforts on Windows 11, which includes Android applications, desktop widgets, and new Xbox gaming features for the desktop computer.

Currently playing: Keep an eye out for this: Windows 11 evaluation: We’re debating whether to upgrade or wait for the next operating system. 8:32

Will I have to switch to Windows 11?

Most likely not. The majority of individuals are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8 on their PCs, and have not upgraded to Windows 10. However, it is suggested that you use the most recent version of software so that you may benefit from security upgrades. Without security upgrades, your computer is vulnerable to malware and other vulnerabilities that can put you at danger of being hacked, infected with viruses, and other threats.

Will Windows 11 be completely free to upgrade?

Yes. Starting on October 5, free upgrades to eligible Windows 10 PCs will be made accessible. The free upgrades will be available until the end of 2022. If you’re still using Windows 7 and want to update to Windows 11, you’ll first need to upgrade to Windows 10 in order to be eligible for the new operating system. Check out this article on how to acquire Windows 10 for free before you get Windows 11.

When will Windows 11 support end?

Because Windows 11 is still in its early stages, we are unlikely to receive a solution to this question for several years. When support for Microsoft 10 expires, the operating system will have been in use for ten years, and Windows 11 might follow a similar schedule. For more information about Windows 11, check out these instructions on how to download the new operating system and how to determine if your computer is compatible. You may also look at what you should do before downloading Windows 11 to learn more about it.

When Will Microsoft Stop Supporting Windows 10?

Because Windows 11 is on the horizon, you might be wondering how long you can securely use Windows 10 while receiving security updates from Microsoft. Here’s what you need to know. We have the solution to your problem.

Desktop Windows 10 Support Ends October 2025

Now that Windows 11 is on the horizon, you may be wondering how long you will be able to use Windows 10 in a secure manner with Microsoft’s ongoing security patches. Answer is in our possession.

When Will Windows 10 Stop Getting Security Updates?

As previously stated, after October 14, 2025, security updates for Windows 10 Home, Pro, Education, Enterprise, and IoT Enterprise will no longer be available for download. For the next few years, Microsoft will continue to provide upgrades to Windows LTSC, which is a specific version of Windows designed for enterprises that require long-term support. Microsoft has announced that Windows 10 LTSC and Windows 10 IoT LTSC will no longer get security updates as of January 9, 2029. Whether we like it or not, Windows 11 is unavoidable at this point.

Microsoft may not fix any new vulnerabilities discovered in Windows 10 after those dates if they are discovered after those dates (althoughrare exceptions to this rulehave happened).

On the plus side, it appears like Windows 11 has a number of important new features, so upgrading should not be a difficult process. CONNECTED: Windows 11: What’s New in Microsoft’s New Operating System

How Long Can I Keep Using Windows 10?

Even if Microsoft stops issuing security updates in October of 2025, Windows 10 will not cease to function as a result of this. That means you may potentially continue to use it (as some diehard Windows users have done in the past with previous versions of the operating system), despite the fact that doing so is typically not a good idea. These days, with sophisticated phishing attempts, remote vulnerabilities, and ransomware all too widespread, the stakes are just too high for the majority of individuals to accept the chance of putting their personal data at danger by using an unsupported operating system.

Someday, we’ll all be able to look back on Windows 10 running in a museum and remember how things used to be.

WANT TO SURVIVE RANSOMWARE?

Here’s How to Keep Your Computer Safe

Microsoft to end Windows 10 support on October 14th, 2025

Microsoft will discontinue support for Windows 10 on October 14, 2025, which is a year from now. Just over ten years have passed since the operating system was initially launched. Microsoft announced the end of support for Windows 10 in an updated support life cycle page for the operating system. According to Thurrott, this is the first time Microsoft has publicly said that support for Windows 10 would be phased down. It’s unclear when the support document was last updated, but according to Thurrott, it previously just listed “when certain Windows 10 versions will cease to be supported,” rather than the entire operating system.

  1. Microsoft has been dropping a lot of signals that it is almost ready to introduce its Windows 11 operating system.
  2. At 11 a.m.
  3. Microsoft executives have also been teasing an announcement on the “next generation of Windows” for months, with one even referring to it as a “new version of Windows” lately.
  4. A new version of Windows featuring substantial user interface improvements, as well as an update of the Windows Store, are expected to be announced by Microsoft in the near future.
  5. We anticipate the release of a new version of Windows in the near future.
  6. Because Microsoft has been releasing regular updates and extending active Windows 10 support, the mainstream end of support has not yet taken effect, according to Microsoft.
  7. Windows 10 has been an unusual release for Microsoft, since the company has shifted away from its traditional rhythm of delivering new versions of the operating system every few years.

Microsoft may have referred to Windows 10 as “the last version of Windows,” but it has already been almost six years since the debut of the operating system, and the company appears to be ready to move on to something new and improved.

Why You Shouldn’t Worry About Windows 10’s End Date

  • At an event scheduled for late June, Microsoft intends to unveil the next edition of its Windows operating system. In preparation of the release, Microsoft has revised the end-of-support date for Windows 10, stating that the operating system would no longer be supported beyond 2025. Users should not be overly concerned about the expiration date, according to experts, because it will not necessarily have an impact on them in the short run.
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At an event scheduled for late June, Microsoft intends to unveil the next version of Windows. With the release approaching, Microsoft has revised the end of support for Windows 10, stating that the operating system will no longer be supported after 2025. Users should not be overly concerned about the expiration date, according to experts, because it will not necessarily have an impact on them in the short term, they say.

Don’t Sweat It

End of support for Windows 10 doesn’t actually mean anything in the immediate future, as long as the operating system continues to function properly. Software and applications will continue to support Windows 10 for at least a few more years, and Microsoft will continue to provide security updates and fixes to consumers. Even when Microsoft publishes Windows 11, the operating system will continue to function effectively for a long period of time after the first release and even after the support end date has passed.

  1. “The end of support for Windows 10 does not imply that the operating system will no longer be usable.
  2. Because new operating systems are frequently plagued by bugs and other issues, being one of the early adopters might occasionally result in your PC encountering issues that arise after the operating system has been released.
  3. “As a result of the incredibly poor migration rate from Windows 7 to 10, it’s possible that they are anticipating a similar result with Windows 11.
  4. The CEO also stated that while the updates will be phased out by the end of 2025, Microsoft would most likely increase the amount of updates and security patches that are delivered in the years leading up to that point.

Update Accessibility

While there is no immediate cause for concern, having a specific expiration date in place at least provides consumers and companies with an idea of when they will need to transition from the current operating system to the next. As a result of the numerous uncertainties yet unresolved regarding the operating system and how Microsoft intends to manage the upgrade, industry analysts warn that users should be prepared to purchase the operating system entirely. Photograph by Sean Gladwell / Getty Images According to Chapman, “one issue that customers should be concerned about is whether or not Microsoft would enable current Windows 10 license users to switch to the reported Windows 11 for free.” “This policy was implemented with Windows 7 and is anticipated to be carried over to Windows 11, however no confirmations have been received as of this writing.

When it comes to encouraging customers to update, Microsoft may be able to make the next version far more accessible if it can devise a suitable inducement. Thank you for informing us about this!

Microsoft: All things must end . even Windows 10

However, while there is no immediate cause for concern, having a specific expiration date in place at least provides consumers and companies with an idea of when they will need to transition from the present operating system to the next one. The operating system and how Microsoft plans to handle the upgrade are still up in the air, and experts believe users should be prepared to purchase it outright if they have any worries about it. Getty Images courtesy of Sean Gladwell / Customers should be cautious about whether Microsoft would enable current Windows 10 license holders to switch for free to the rumored Windows 11 operating system, according to Chapman.

It is possible that customers may be required to purchase the entire operating system when it is launched, with no present indication of what costs will be in 2025.” Windows 7 is now available for $140, making it too expensive for low-income households to upgrade to newer versions of the software.

Congratulations on notifying us!

It’salwaysbeen October 2025

Microsoft has said in black and white that all versions of Windows 10 –Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education — would be retired on October 14, 2025, which is four years and four months from now. Customers are reminded that “Microsoft will continue to support at least one Windows 10 Semi-Annual Channel until October 14, 2025(emphasis added)” in a blue-boxed remark that is added to the “it’s ending” statement. However, this date — or at the very least the month and year — has been associated with the end of support for Windows 10 since, well, forever.

(This is precisely the same as, for example, Windows 7 and all previous versions of Windows.) As Computerworld noted in July, Microsoft’s accounting of that 10-year length of support for Windows 10 finally provided clarity to the company’s opaque assertions regarding support in the previous months.

According to the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, the support URLs identified by Thurrott.com and echoed by other sites have carried the Oct.

) Although the Wayback Machine was explicit about the history of the Home/Pro and Enterprise/Education SKUs’ end-of-support pages, Computerworldreporters, who have visited those URLs dozens of times this year alone to verify retirement dates for specific feature upgrades, did not recall the big blue box and did not notice the 10-year end of support for Windows 10 as a whole.

( Strange.) So no matter how many stories on the internet suggest that Microsoft’s retirement date of 2025 is an entirely new concept, a deadline that has only recently been stated by the company, this is not true.

If it’s not new, why the brouhaha?

It’s hardly surprising that so many people believed the deadline of October 14, 2025, was novel and noteworthy. Microsoft stated six years ago that Windows 10 will be supported for a decade, exactly like every other version of its operating system. However, throughout those six years, everyone seems to have forgotten about that commitment. Not because of pages falling out of a stock calendar photo, but rather because of the cognitive dissonance between what Microsoft stated and what Microsoft did, according to the article.

  • If something is everlasting, how could there be a day on which it is no longer alive?
  • There are no expiration dates for services provided.
  • Windows coasted and rested, if not on any acclaim, then on the practical difficulty of a competitor replacing it in the commercial and organizational sectors, respectively.
  • It all appears to be a complete waste of time and effort.
  • It’s little surprise that many were interested: if retirement is the ultimate state for Windows 10, what was the point of the last six years?

So, Windows 10 will end. How will that work?

When it comes to the support lifecycle pages for Windows 10, the most noteworthy part is the warning that reads, “Microsoft will continue to support at least one Windows 10 Semi-Annual Channel until October 14, 2025.” However, while the notice and the release cycle of Windows 10 do not represent anything close to an official plan for how Microsoft will retire Windows 10 — ideally, next week’s virtual event on June 25 will outline the operating system’s retirement — there are some things that can be gleaned from the coincidence of the notice and the release cycle of Windows.

  1. Because of the time lapses between the delivery of a feature upgrade and the expiration of that feature upgrade — the 18 or 30 months of support that Microsoft has committed to — the firm will have to stop distributing feature upgrades far before the company’s planned end date of Oct.
  2. Assuming Microsoft continues to release two feature upgrades per year, with the first-half release supported for 18 months and the second-half release supported for 30 months, the final upgrade would have to be Windows 10 24H1, with support ending a year and a half later, on Oct.
  3. The finalyyH2feature update (which would be supported for 30 months) would be 22H2, and that SKU would be phased off of service in April or May of the following year.
  4. Another approach would be to wait until Windows 10 22H2 is released in October 2022 and extend its support for an additional six months (for a total of 36 months) so that it, like the 21H2 example, falls out of support in October 2025 as well.
  5. When it comes to the final release, Microsoft might select 24H1 or, if its developers wanted to drop 10 months sooner, they could go for 23H1 and give that refresh an additional 12 months (for a total of 30 months) in order to make it to October 2025.

Yes, things may get a little messy. Yes, it is possible to feel perplexed. For Microsoft’s muddled, convoluted feature upgrade rollout plan, which the company devised and then tweaked numerous times over the course of six years, users will have to bear the brunt of the financial consequences.

Aren’t you forgetting Windows 10 LTSC?

What’s particularly fascinating about the support lifecycle pages for Windows 10 Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education is the caution that reads, “Microsoft will continue to support at least one Windows 10 Semi-Annual Channel until October 14, 2025.” However, while the notice and the release cycle of Windows 10 do not represent anything close to an official plan for how Microsoft will retire Windows 10 — ideally, next week’s virtual event on June 25 will outline the operating system’s retirement — there are some things that can be gleaned from the convergence of the notice and the release cycle of Windows.

A feature upgrade’s release and expiry are separated by a significant period of time — the 18 or 30 months of support Microsoft has committed to — and the business will have to stop distributing feature upgrades far before the company’s planned end of support date of Oct.

For example, assuming that Microsoft continues to release two feature upgrades per year, with the first-half release supported for 18 months and the second-half release supported for 30 months, the final upgrade would have to be Windows 10 24H1, with support ending a year and a half later, on Oct.

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That particular SKU would be supported until April or May of 2025, after which it would be decommissioned.

It’s also possible that Microsoft will simply designate an earlier feature upgrade — 21H2, for example, if a revamped Windows 10 +nHome/Pro release appears alongside an earlier feature upgrade — and simply extend that version’s support to 48 months, taking it all the way through the October 2025 end date.

Something similar may be accomplished for Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro, both of which receive feature updates that are supported for just 18 months after their initial release.

This may become really messy, believe it or not!

For Microsoft’s muddled, complicated feature upgrade delivery plan, which the company devised and then tweaked numerous times over the course of six years, users will have to bear the brunt of the financial burden.

When will Microsoft end support for your version of Windows or Office?

When it comes to the software that runs your business, “set it and forget it” is no longer an option. As a result, the support clock for Windows 10 expires far sooner than you may imagine. Furthermore, the deadlines for Windows 7 and Office 2010 are rapidly approaching. What you need to know is as follows: On April 10, 2018, a significant milestone will be reached if your business is operating Windows 10. In the case of Windows 10 version 1607 (also known as the “Anniversary Update”), that date represents the formal end of support.

  • If the shortened lifetime appears to be a significant departure from prior versions, then welcome to the “Windows as a service” age of computing.
  • As I’ve previously stated, it’s essentially a contract between Microsoft and everyone who acquires a license to use its main products, which include Windows (desktop and server) and Office (desktop and server).
  • For more than a decade, the support lifecycle for each new version of Windows or Office was ten years, with mainstream support lasting five years and extended support lasting an additional five years for each new release.
  • As Microsoft transitions to its “Windows as a service” and “Office 365 subscription models,” that 10-year support lifespan is fast eroding.
  • However, products like as Windows 10’s Semi-Annual Channel and Office 365, which adhere to the Modern Lifecycle Policy, are fast displacing it.
  • That follows a similar long list of products, including Windows Vista and Office 2007, whose support was phased down throughout the first half of this year.
  • What is the expected lifespan of Windows 10 support?
  • It was widely speculated that Microsoft will use the chance to modify its long-standing 10-year support lifecycle when Windows 10 was released in anticipation of its release.
  • In addition to a five-year mainstream support period that began on July 29, 2015, Windows 10 features a second five-year extended support phase that begins in 2020 and runs through October 2025.
  • And it is at this point that things become tricky.

Microsoft published the first significant update, version 1511, in November 2015; the second feature update, version 1607 (the Anniversary Update), was released in summer 2016; and the most recent updates, versions 1703 and 1709, were released in April and October of this year, according to Microsoft.

  1. On May 9, 2017, the original release of Windows 10 came to an end, marking the conclusion of that time.
  2. Check out the Windows lifecycle fact sheet for the most up to current information on when each Windows 10 version will be no longer be available for purchase.
  3. As a result, the end-of-service date for Windows 10 version 1607 has been moved back six months, making the last date for Windows 10 version 1607 October 9, 2018, rather than October 9, 2017.
  4. Owners of devices made with the Intel Clover Trail processor family that were three or four years old were unfortunate enough to find themselves in this position.
  5. Customers that use the Long Term Servicing Branch (LTSB) in corporate installations are the ones who care the most about the 10-year upgrade cycle for Windows 10.

The 2015 LTSB release has the same support dates as those listed above. The support dates for the 2016 LTSB release have been pushed back by a year, to October 12, 2021, and October 13, 2026, respectively, to accommodate the new version.

  • Mainstream support will be discontinued on October 1. 13th of February, 2020
  • The extended support period will conclude on October 31st. 14th of April, 2025

How long will Windows 8 and 8.1 be maintained by Microsoft? In accordance with Microsoft’s officialWindows 8.1 Support Lifecycle Policy, Windows 8.1 is treated as if it were a service pack for the operating system Windows 8. This indicates that the lifetime estimates begin when Windows 8 was released, which was in 2012. “Two years after the General Availability of the Windows 8.1 upgrade,” or on October 18, 2015, support for the initial iteration of Windows 8 was officially discontinued. Windows Server 2012 (which was introduced at the same time as Windows 8) and Windows Server 2012 R2 are subject to a similar restriction (equivalent to Windows 8.1).

The vast majority of PCs that came preloaded with the first release of Windows 8 have long ago vanished from shop shelves and distribution channels.

  • Is there a timeframe for Windows 8/8.1 support? In accordance with Microsoft’s official Windows 8.1 Support Lifecycle Policy, Windows 8.1 is treated as if it were a service pack for the operating system Windows 8. So the estimates for Windows 8’s lifetime begin with the launch of the operating system in 2012. “Two years after the General Availability of the Windows 8.1 upgrade,” or on October 18, 2015, Microsoft ceased support for the initial edition of Windows 8. Windows Server 2012 (which was introduced at the same time as Windows 8) and Windows Server 2012 R2 are subject to a policy that is comparable to this (equivalent to Windows 8.1). Each of the supported OSes is still under support, however the end of support date for each of these OSes is same, and it is predicated on the introduction of Windows Server 2012. The vast majority of PCs that came preloaded with the first release of Windows 8 have long ago vanished from shop shelves and online stores. If you are one of the diminishing number of PC users who are still using Windows 8, you may update to Windows 8.1 for free via the Windows Store.

What is the expected lifespan of Windows 7 support? However, despite the fact that Windows 10 is making significant headway in the consumer part of the market, this is still a tremendously successful Windows edition in general. It is required that you install Service Pack 1 for the following support dates (Windows 7 RTM support ended in April 2013) Take note that these dates are the same for Windows Server 2008 R2 as they are for Windows Server 2008. In a previous version of this piece, I projected that Microsoft would not extend the support date for Windows XP, and my prediction proved correct.

When the deadline for this popular operating system approaches in January 2020, there will almost probably be a groundswell of support for an extension, but it is not likely to happen.

  • Mainstream support has ended: This product is no longer supported. Support for the extended period will terminate on January 14, 2020.

Office support dates

The Office support lifecycle is quite similar to the Windows support lifecycle, with one key exception. Monthly or annual subscriptions to Office 365 are available, with the most recent version of the Office desktop applications always being sent. Depending on the edition, the Office desktop applications can be installed on up to 10 PCs or Macs at the same time. Microsoft continues to sell classic versions of Office with a perpetual license, as it has done since the company’s founding. These products are subject to regular security and reliability updates, but they are not eligible for feature enhancements.

This is the most recent version of Office, with a support schedule that is completely aligned with the one offered by Windows 10.

  • Mainstream support will be discontinued on October 13, 2020
  • Extended support will be discontinued on October 14, 2025.

Is Office 2013 going to continue to be maintained indefinitely?

The Office 2013 support timetable is approximately three months longer than the Windows 8.1 support plan. The subscription version of Microsoft Office 2013, which is included in Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus, will no longer be supported after February 28, 2017.

  • Mainstream support will be discontinued on April 10, 2018
  • Extended support will be discontinued on April 11, 2023.

I’m wondering how long Office 2010 will be supported. Office 2010 Service Pack 1 was no longer supported as of October 14, 2014. After installing Service Pack 2, you’ll discover that this version has a lengthy extended support term ahead of it, with end-of-support dates nine months later than those of Windows 7.

  • Mainstream support has ended: This product is no longer supported. Support for the extended period will cease on October 13, 2020.

HOW THE FIXED SUPPORT LIFECYCLE WORKS

Windows and Office versions prior to Windows 7 and Office 2007 are supported by Microsoft for at least five years under mainstream support, followed by another five years under extended support. Microsoft Windows and Office have lifecycles that are the same for both corporate and personal users. End-of-support dates for service packs are distinct from one another. For example, if you want to be eligible for Windows 7 support, you must first install Service Pack 1. For anyone interested in learning more about this, there is a comprehensiveFAQ.) For the purposes of this definition, “supported” indicates that you have access to at least one sort of aided support option (which may or may not be charged) as well as no-charge security updates through channels such as Windows Update and the Download Center The calculations begin with the date of general availability (GA) for each product in question.

  • When you officially retire from support, the date is the second Tuesday of the first month of the quarter after the anniversary of when you originally retired (which also happens to be Patch Tuesday).
  • When it comes to Windows 7, you can conduct the calculations yourself.
  • The fifth anniversary of the day came on October 22, 2014.
  • As a result, mainstream support came to an end at that point.
  • (Those estimates do not apply to Windows XP, which had its end-of-life date artificially extended.) Find out when a Microsoft product will no longer get official support by going to the Microsoft Product Lifecycle Search page, the product family index, or the whole A-Z product index.
  • Of course, it’s important to remember that the cessation of assistance does not imply the end of a person’s life.
  • In the same way, Windows 7 computers will continue to function even when the clock strikes midnight in less than three years.
  • When the extended support period expires, the security updates released on Patch Tuesday will no longer be available.
  • Microsoft’s final custom support agreement for Windows 2000 expired in 2016, more than six years after extended support was officially discontinued.
  • Even that, though, is experiencing significant transformation.
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After those dates, we will no longer provide custom support for any version of Microsoft Office products after they have reached the end of support (Exchange Server; Office Suites; SharePoint Server; Office Communications Server; Lync Server; Skype for Business Server; Project Server and Visio).

It’s possible that Microsoft may impose a similar strict stance on Windows 7, but that choice is far from certain and will be heavily influenced by how many PCs are still running Windows 7 when the 2020 deadline comes around.

What will the 2025 end of life mean for enterprise Windows 10?

The mainstream support provided by Microsoft for previous versions of Windows and Office lasts a minimum of five years, after which the extended support lasts a further five years. Microsoft Windows and Office have lifecycles that are the same for both commercial and consumer editions. End-of-support dates for service packs are distinct from those for the main product. In order to be eligible for Windows 7 support, you must first install Service Pack 1 (SP1). For anyone interested in learning more, there is an extensiveFAQ available.) As a rule, being “supported” implies that you have access to at least one form of aided assistance option (which might include a fee) and that you have access to free security updates through channels such as Windows Update and the Download Center.

  • After one year, the official date of retirement for support is on the second Tuesday of the month after the anniversary of that date (which also happens to be Patch Tuesday).
  • The calculation may be done by oneself with Windows 7.
  • October 22, 2014, marked five years since that date.
  • Consequently, mainstream support was withdrawn at that point.
  • For Windows XP, whose end-of-life date was intentionally prolonged, such figures are incorrect.
  • The general availability date, the retirement dates for mainstream and extended support, and the retirement dates for service packs are all displayed when you locate the record for a given product in a product database.
  • Even though Windows XP and Windows Vista are no longer supported by Microsoft, PCs running these operating systems continue to operate normally (if not securely).
  • Every second Tuesday of the month, the only thing that will be different will be an unsettling stillness.
  • Historically, large business clients that have custom support agreements with Microsoft and who are ready to pay a very high fee for a Premium Support agreement have been permitted to continue receiving bespoke upgrades after the official end of support.
  • Some Windows XP users are still covered under custom maintenance agreements.
  • It was confirmed by Microsoft in 2016 that commercial customers will not be permitted to extend support for Office 2007.

Once those dates, we will no longer provide bespoke support for any version of Microsoft Office products after the end of support dates have passed (Exchange Server; Office Suites; SharePoint Server; Office Communications Server; Lync Server; Skype for Business Server; Project Server and Visio).

It’s possible that Microsoft may impose a similar strict stance on Windows 7, but that choice is far from certain and will be heavily influenced by how many PCs are still running Windows 7 when the 2020 deadline comes into effect.

Read more on Microsoft Windows software

Please give your retiring operating system the befitting Viking funeral it deserves by arranging a suitable Viking funeral for it. Aurich Lawson is a Getty Images contributor. This summer, Microsoft will release a new aesthetic upgrade for Windows, codenamed Sun Valley. For the most part, we’ve assumed that this update would simply bring a new look to Windows 10 21H2—the major release of Windows 10 scheduled for the second half of 2021—but new information in the form of end-of-life (EOL) dates for Windows 10 and a leaked screenshot of something purporting to be “Windows 11 Pro” strongly suggest that more significant changes are on the way.

Windows 10 EOL in 2025

Rumored to be “Windows 11,” rumors about Sun Valley’s existence have been swirling for months, but we didn’t place much faith in them until lately. It was expected that Windows 10 would be delivered as a service, marking a significant break from the previous period of major Windows releases every three years or more. Because of Sun Valley’s “sweeping aesthetic rejuvenation,” it appeared like Windows 10 21H2 will look drastically different than the previous version of the operating system (Windows 10 21H1).

  • The first solid indicator that greater things may be on the horizon came last week in the form of a Windows 10 End of Life notification provided by Microsoft.
  • Modern Lifecycle Policy defines “retiring” as the process of a product ceasing to be supported completely; this is in contrast to the previous Fixed Lifecycle Policy, which distinguished between “mainstream” and “extended” maintenance options.
  • As Windows Central points out, the concept of a “retirement date” is not a completely new concept.
  • What has changed is the tone with which Microsoft is speaking about the end of support.
  • Microsoft has announced the end of life date, and we have no reason to believe that it will not occur.
  • The most intriguing questions relate on what will happen next and when it will take place, respectively.

Windows 11 in 2021?

  • The operating system version is shown as “Windows 11 Pro” in this leaked “About this PC” image from Betaworld on Baidu. The start menu in the leaked pictures appears to be quite similar to that of Windows 10X: launched the central screen, which included a barrage of Mac-like icons

We’d been hearing whispers about Sun Valley being the next Windows for a few months, but we weren’t convinced until Microsoft said that Windows 10 will be phased out completely. Windows 10 has been marketed as “Windows as a Service,” with no set end date in mind, and there was no reason to believe that this would be any different in practice. The end-of-life date for Windows 10 as an operating system as a whole alters all of that, as evidenced by leaked screenshots of a Windows build purporting to be “Windows 11 Pro” that appeared on Baidu today.

The new build has a visual appearance that is identical to the scrapped Windows 10X, and its images look to be genuine. (The Verge claims to be able to “confirm they are authentic,” but provides no further details.)

What does a new version of Windows mean for me?

The implications of a new “Windows 11” for end customers are currently unknown, as there are no guarantees that existing Windows 10 licenses would allow for the usage of Windows 11, much alone an in-place upgrade to the new operating system. We also don’t know when fresh Windows 10 releases will stop, when the first Windows 11 will be released, or how much the next operating system will cost. We do, however, have a few of informed guesses on the subject. According to Microsoft’s generous upgrade policies from Windows 7 to Windows 10 (you can still update for free right now!) this clearly implies a similar strategy for Windows 11, which Microsoft will surely be eager to get people on board with.

  1. Upgrades that can be performed on-site are almost always available.
  2. For example, Windows 10 21H1 (the most recent release) is only supported until December 2022, whereas Windows 7 is only supported until December 2022.
  3. When a version of a software program is no longer supported, you are required to update to the following version in order to continue receiving support and bug patches.
  4. In the meanwhile, we don’t anticipate to see a new Windows 10 edition until at least 2023, which would suggest that the operating system will need to be supported beyond its October 2025 retirement date.

More details are on the way

You are not alone if you find the absence of specific information in this section aggravating. The good news is that we won’t have to wait long for further information: Microsoft’sWhat’s Next for Windowsdigital event will take place on June 24, and we can anticipate plenty of screenshots, news, and more specific upgrade recommendations at that event.

How Long Will Microsoft Support Windows 10?

Not only are you not alone in feeling frustrated by the lack of concrete detail provided in this section. More information will be available soon, though, since Microsoft’sWhat’s Next for Windowsdigital event will take place on June 24, and we should anticipate plenty of pictures, news, and more specific upgrade recommendations to be released at this time.

Recommended by Our Editors

Those who notice the absence of solid detail in this article are not alone. The good news is that we won’t have to wait long for further information: Microsoft’sWhat’s Next for Windowsdigital event will take place on June 24, and we can anticipate plenty of screenshots, news, and more specific upgrade recommendations at that time.

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